Five Ways Job Is a Type of Jesus Christ

After Job suffered, he served as one of the clearest types of Christ in the Old Testament. Job longed for his Mediator, Advocate, and Redeemer throughout his trials, and then he became a picture of the Person, Jesus Christ, to his friends.

1. Job’s Sacrifice and Intercession Turned Away God’s Wrath

Job 42:7-8—And so it was, after the Lord had spoken these words to Job, that the Lord said to Eliphaz the Temanite, “My wrath is aroused against you and your two friends, for you have not spoken of Me what is right, as My servant Job has. Now therefore, take for yourselves seven bulls and seven rams, go to My servant Job, and offer up for yourselves a burnt offering; and My servant Job shall pray for you. For I will accept him, lest I deal with you according to your folly; because you have not spoken of Me what is right, as My servant Job has.”

God said His “wrath was aroused against [Job’s] friends.” How could God’s wrath be turned away? This was hundreds of years before the Mosaic law instituted the sacrificial system, but even then it was clear an offering needed to be made for sin. Seven is the number of completion, which means Job’s offering pictured a perfect sacrifice on his friends’ behalf. Continue reading “Five Ways Job Is a Type of Jesus Christ”

4 Graduation Tips for Seniors

4 Graduation Tips for Seniors
A view from the back table where the kids sat. My son Ricky is in the middle. The screen shows the welcome slide.

Each year one of the outreaches Woodland Christian Church puts on is the Senior Dinner. The graduates join us in the fellowship hall for a nice meal. I present a message with graduation tips, and my brother brother-in-law, D.J. Malinowski, plays some music (see below).

I tell the seniors that I’m going to share with them the four graduation tips I wish someone would’ve shared with me when I was in their place. I use a PowerPoint presentation and the slides are below…

4 graduation tips for seniors
The welcome slide that was up when they arrived.
4 graduation tips for seniors
Contrasting two individuals who invest the same amount of money at the same interest rate, but one starts at 20 and the other at 30. The person who started 10 years earlier makes over twice as much as the other.

Continue reading “4 Graduation Tips for Seniors”

Do you have a spiritual hunger?

Do you have a spiritual hunger?
Do you have a spiritual hunger?

A previous post laid the foundation for understanding the Beatitudes, and the last post discussed the first Beatitude: spiritual poverty. The second Beatitude discuses spiritual hunger: Blessed are you who hunger now, for you shall be filled” (Luke 6:20). 

Jesus presented values that were contrary to the thinking of the day, and this is a perfect example. Hunger isn’t a common problem in our wealthy nation, but in other parts of the world – and in Jesus’ day – it’s one of the worst trials people experience. For many it means starvation and death, and for this reason those who hunger aren’t blessed. The world would say they’re cursed.

Scripture also doesn’t present hunger as a blessing:

  • Proverbs 30:8-9 Feed me with the food allotted to me…Lest I be full and deny You, and say, “Who is the Lord?”
  • In Isaiah 8:21 God said the Assyrians would invade the land, consume everything, and leave the Israelites destitute: [The people] will pass through [the land] hard-pressed and hungry; and it shall happen, when they are hungry, that they will be enraged and curse…their God, and look upward.”

Continue reading “Do you have a spiritual hunger?”

The Gospel Is Explained Financially in Scripture

The Gospel is explained financially in Scripture by using words accounting terms. The best way to appreciate the beauty that takes place when believers put their faith in Christ is by understanding these words. Let’s take a look at each of them!

The Gospel Is Explained Financially: Sin Debt

Because of our sins, we have a huge amount of sin debt against God. When Jesus taught His disciples to pray in Matthew 6:12 He encouraged them to say, “Forgive us our debts.” In the Parable of the Unforgiving Servant, the man doesn’t have a huge criminal record, but he does have a huge amount of debt. The servant pleaded with the king for mercy. In Matthew 18:27 it says, “The master of that servant was moved with compassion, released him, and forgave him the debt.” The forgiveness of the man’s debt pictured the forgiveness of his sins.

The Gospel Is Explained Financially: Ransom and Redemption

marriage-gods-way-author-scott-lapierre Gospel is explained financiallyA ransom is something paid to cancel or erase a person’s debt. In Matthew 20:28 Jesus said He “did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.” Paul said, “Jesus gave Himself a ransom for all” (1 Tim 2:6).

When someone pays the ransom for another’s debt, it’s known as redemption. The individual who pays the ransom is known as a redeemer. Titus 2:14 says, “Jesus gave Himself for us, that He might redeem us from every lawless deed.” Peter discussed what was required to cancel our sin debt and he said we “were not redeemed with corruptible things, like silver or gold…but with the precious blood of Christ” (1 Pet 1:18, 19).

The Gospel Is Explained Financially: Imputation of Sin and Righteousness

“Impute” is accounting term referring to moving assets from one side of a ledger to the other. The Greek word for impute is logizomai, and it occurs forty-one times in Scripture. Almost half of those times it occurs in Romans, and of those nineteen times, eleven times it occurs in chapter 4! Just like 1 Corinthians 13 is the Love Chapter, Romans 4 is the Imputation Chapter. Continue reading “The Gospel Is Explained Financially in Scripture”

Paradoxes in the Bible

Paradoxes are statements that seem contradictory, inconsistent, or absurd, but are nonetheless true…and the Bible is full of paradoxes…

Here’s one of the most common: God exalts the humble and humbles the exalted:

  • 1 Peter 5:6 Humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you in due time
  • James 4:10 Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and He will lift you up.

This principle is expressed in the Old Testament as well:

  • 1 Samuel 2:8 God raises the poor from the dust
    And lifts the beggar from the ash heap,
    To set them among princes
    And make them inherit the throne of glory
  • Ezekiel 21:26 Thus says the Lord God, “Remove the turban, and take off the crown;
    Nothing shall remain the same.
    Exalt the humble, and humble the exalted.”

Here are a few more paradoxes:

  • In Matthew 23:11 Jesus said, “Whoever wants to be greatest, should be everyone’s servant.”
  • In Mark 9:35 Jesus said, “Anyone who wants to be first, must be the very last.”
  • In Luke 17:33 Jesus said, “Whoever tries to keep their lives will lose it, and whoever loses their lives will keep it.”
  • In 2 Corinthians 12:10 and 13:9 Paul said, “When we are weak we are strong.”
  • James 1:2 says, “Count it all joy when you fall into various trials.

Other paradoxes are subtler. For example, Luke 1:50 says God’s mercy is for those who fear Him. People who are most afraid of God have the least to fear from Him, and people who don’t fear God have the most to fear from Him. This is a paradox. It doesn’t make sense: if you fear God you don’t have to be afraid of Him, but if you don’t fear God, you have a lot to fear from Him.

Think about Nineveh, the capital of Assyria. The Assyrians were known for their cruelty and brutality. They mutilated people, resettled entire populations, and rejoiced over butchering their victims. They had absolutely no fear of God, and as a result had every reason to fear God: in Jonah 3:4 the prophet told the people, “In forty days God is going to destroy your city.” The people became afraid of God and dramatically repented. As a result, God’s mercy toward them became so great that when Jonah still wanted to see them judged, God rebuked the prophet for his lack of mercy saying, “Should I not pity these people?” (Jonah 4:11). The simple point is this: when they didn’t fear God they had everything to fear from God, but when they feared God, they had nothing to fear from Him.

I’d like to mention one more paradox, but there are three things I’d like to say about it first:

  1. While the previous paradoxes could be quoted, there isn’t one specific verse to capture this paradox.
  2. Even without one specific verse, this paradox is a truth maintained throughout the entire Bible.
  3. This is the most important paradox in the Bible as it determines where individuals spend eternity.

The paradox is this: people who think they’re righteous will be declared unrighteous by God, and people who declare their unrighteousness will be declared righteous by God.

Justification is the process by which God declares unrighteous sinners to be righteous. In other words, people are justified when God has declared them righteous. It isn’t about them being righteous; it is about God declaring them to be righteous. The Bible is very clear that there is only one way for individuals to be justified (or declared righteous by God), and that is by faith:

  • Romans 3:28 We conclude that a man is justified by faith apart from the deeds of the law.
  • Romans 5:1 Having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.
  • Galatians 2:16 A person is not justified by the works of the law, but by faith in Christ. We have put our faith in Christ Jesus that we may be justified by faith in Christ and not by the works of the law, because by the works of the law no one will be justified.

Individuals declaring their righteousness think they’re good, trust in themselves, do not seek the righteousness that is available by faith, and therefore will not be justified by God. Individuals declaring their unrighteousness recognize they’re not good, don’t trust in themselves, seek the righteousness that is available by faith, and therefore will be justified by God.

This paradox is most clearly seen in the Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector.

  • Of the Pharisee it says he prayed thus with himself, ‘God, I thank You that I am not like other men—extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give tithes of all that I possess.’” (Luke 18:11, 12).
  • Of the tax collector it says, “standing afar off, [he] would not so much as raise his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me a sinner!’ (Luke 18:13).

Then Jesus said, “I tell you, this tax collector went down to his house justified, rather than the Pharisee.” (Luke 18:13).

This is a paradox. The individual who – by all outward evidence – was exceptionally righteous shouldn’t be declared unrighteous and the tax collector – an individual the Bible identifies as terribly unrighteous (Matt 9:10, 11:19, Mark 2:16, Luke 5:30, 7:34, 15:1, 18:13) – shouldn’t be declared righteous. Those who believe they deserve heaven and are good enough to enter it will find themselves infinitely far from it, and those who know they don’t deserve heaven and could never be good enough to enter it will be welcomed.

These paradoxes are why God says, “My thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways My ways. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are My ways higher than your ways and My thoughts than your thoughts” (Isa 55:8, 9).

And these paradoxes are why Paul can say, “Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments and how unfathomable His ways” (Rom 11:33).