Introduction for A Father Offers His Son

A Father Offers His Son should be published in the next few months! I expect to send the manuscript to my editor this week. The Introduction (below) will give you a good idea what to expect. If you like what you read, please consider:

Your responsibilities would be:

  1. Serve as a beta reader: simply read the manuscript and give me your honest thoughts. This will allow me to improve the book before it’s published.
  2. Provide a review on Amazon
  3. Share about A Father Offers His Son when it’s published. 

As a way to thank you I will give you:

  1. A free signed copy
  2. As many signed copies as you’d like at 20% off

Introduction for A Father Offers His Son

I became a Christian in my early twenties. Soon after, I started reading the Bible for the first time. Like many people, I began “in the beginning” at Genesis 1:1. I read through accounts I had some familiarity with: Creation, The Fall, Cain and Abel, the Flood. I didn’t struggle with much of what I read, including even the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. Then everything came to a screeching halt when I read Genesis 22:1­­-2:

Now it came to pass after these things that God tested Abraham, and said to him, “Abraham!”
And he said, “Here I am.”
Then He said, “Take now your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah, and offer him there as a burnt offering on one of the mountains of which I shall tell you.”

I thought, “Why would God make such a request? I can understand God calling down fire on Sodom and Gomorrah, but how could He ask Abraham to sacrifice his own son?” The truth is, God didn’t intend for Abraham to sacrifice Isaac. We know that because the Angel stopped him: “Do not lay your hand on the lad, or do anything to him (Genesis 22:12a).” If God didn’t want Abraham to sacrifice Isaac, then what did He want? The answer is two-fold. Continue reading “Introduction for A Father Offers His Son”

The Mediator, Advocate, and Redeemer in Job

The Book of Job provides some of the greatest revelation of the Messiah in the Old Testament. Although Job didn’t have the revelation that we have, he still looked forward to a Mediator, Advocate, and Redeemer. Centuries later, Jesus revealed Himself to be the reality and substance of Job’s words.

Job Needed a Mediator

He longed for a Person to stand between him and God:

Job 9:1–2—Job asked: “Truly I know it is so, but how can a man be righteous before God?”

This is the most important question people can ask, because it determines where we spend eternity. Job answered his question and explained why “a man [cannot] be righteous before God”:

Job 9:3–4—“If one wished to contend with Him, he could not answer Him one time out of a thousand.
God is wise in heart and mighty in strength. Who has hardened himself against Him and prospered?”

Nobody can stand before God and respond to His questions. Job learned this the hard way when he was finally given his audience. Continue reading “The Mediator, Advocate, and Redeemer in Job”

The Need to Prepare for Trials

Since we can expect trials, we must prepare for them.

An Old Testament Example that Encourages us to Prepare for Trials

Unfortunately, sometimes people read the Old Testament and think, “What does this have to do with me? How can I learn from people whose lives are so different from mine?” The New Testament states the Old Testament provides us with examples:

  • Romans 15:4a—“For whatever things were written [in the Old Testament] were written for our learning.”
  • 1 Corinthians 10:11a—“Now all these things happened to [the Israelites] as examples, and they were written for our admonition.”

Church Age believers can learn from Old Testament accounts. Often, they provide a backdrop for New Testament instruction.

Prepare for Trials During Times of Peace

Asa was one of the  good kings in the Old Testament, and he reveals how (and when) to prepare for trials. Early in his reign, God gave him peace. What did he do during this restful time? He built! Part of 2 Chronicles 14:5–7 records:

The kingdom was quiet under [Asa]. And he built fortified cities in Judah, for the land had rest; he had no war in those years, because the Lord had given him rest. Therefore he said to Judah, “Let us build these cities and make walls around them, and towers, gates, and bars, while the land is yet before us, because we have sought the Lord our God; we have sought Him, and He has given us rest on every side.” So they built and prospered.

Like Asa, we should prepare during peaceful times. While Asa strengthened his nation physically, we should strengthen ourselves spiritually. Pray and read the Word regularly. Serve the body of Christ. We do not serve others so they will serve us. We serve others because we want to serve Christ, but one blessing often produced is brothers and sisters who will “weep with [us when we] weep” and “suffer with [us]” when we suffer (Romans 12:15b, 1 Corinthians 12:26a). I have seen people enter trials and become frustrated that nobody was there for them, but in many of those cases they were not there for others who were “weeping” and “suffering.” Continue reading “The Need to Prepare for Trials”

How Did Salvation and Forgiveness Take Place in the Old Testament?

How were people forgiven (or saved) in the Old Testament? Did forgiveness (or salvation) take place through sacrifices or human effort? The short answer is forgiveness (and salvation) was received in the Old Testament the same way it’s received in the New Testament: by grace through faith.

Unfortunately, people think of the Gospel as a New Testament invention, but Paul uses the Old Testament to present the Gospel. He explains justification by faith apart from the law and works in Romans 3:21-28. Then he discusses two prominent Old Testament men to have credibility with his Jewish readers. In the process he shows people were forgiven (or saved) in the Old Testament, just as believers are in the New Testament.

Paul’s First Example of Old Testament Salvation: Abraham—The Father of the Jewish People

Although Abraham was well-respected, he committed well-known sins:

  • God commanded Abraham to leave his family behind. He failed by bringing his nephew Lot (Genesis 12:1-4).
  • Abraham failed when he left Canaan, went to Egypt, and tried to protect himself by telling Sarah to say she was his sister (Genesis 12:10-20).
  • Sarah told Abraham to have a child with Hagar, and he obeyed her (Genesis 16:1-2).
  • Abraham lied about Sarah being his sister (Genesis 20:2).

Romans 4:1—What then shall we say that Abraham, our forefather, discovered in this matter? 2 If, in fact, Abraham was justified by works, he had something to boast about—but not before God.

We can boast if we’re justified by works, “but not before God,” because it wouldn’t impress him.

Romans 4:3—What does the Scripture say? “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness.”

Paul quotes Genesis 15:6, which summarizes the Gospel. Abraham was justified by faith. He was saved by believing God.

Romans 4:4—Now when a man works, his wages are not credited to him as a gift, but as an obligation.

When your boss gives you a paycheck you’d be offended if he said, “This is a gift.” You worked for it; therefore, you earned it. A system of works makes God “obligated” to us.

Romans 4:5—However, to the man who does not work but trusts God who justifies the wicked, his faith is credited as righteousness.

The man who attempts to be justified – or saved – by works is not trusting God. He’s trusting himself. The man who trusts God finds his faith credited – or given to him – as righteousness.

Paul’s Second Example of Old Testament Salvation: David—The King of the Jewish People

According to God’s Law, David committed two sins that should’ve resulted in death: adultery and murder (2 Samuel 11). A few things made David’s terrible sins even worse:

  • David’s accountability—He knew God’s Law well.
  • David was blessed—God brought him of that shepherd’s field where he was a nobody born to a no-name family. Then God turned him into the rich and powerful king of Israel.
  • David’s sins were premeditated—He planned out all the details, even writing a letter to Joab that he had Uriah himself carry. It was one of the darkest moments in the Old Testament.

If David had to be justified, or declared righteous by works, he’d stand condemned before God. Since justification is by faith, he felt very blessed…

Romans 4:6—David says the same thing when he speaks of the blessedness of the man to whom God credits righteousness apart from works:

David agreed with Abraham about justification by faith, and he wrote about his thankfulness in Psalm 32:1-2, which Paul quoted in Romans 4:7-8:

“Blessed are they
whose transgressions are forgiven,
whose sins are covered.
Blessed is the man
whose sin the Lord will never count against him.”

When you’ve sinned like David did, you’re very thankful when God doesn’t “count” those sins against you, but instead “counts” or “credits” righteousness to you.

Romans 4:9-10—Is this blessedness only for the circumcised, or also for the uncircumcised? We have been saying that Abraham’s faith was credited to him as righteousness. Under what circumstances was it credited? Was it after he was circumcised, or before? It was not after, but before!

Abraham was declared righteous by God in Genesis 15:6 when he “believed God” at 86 years old. He wasn’t circumcised until Genesis 17:24, when he 99. Since he was declared righteous 13 years before he was circumcised, he had to be justified by faith and not works.

David’s Sins Should not Have Received Forgiveness

If anyone deserved death it was David, but this is also why David’s situation provides one of the greatest examples of God’s grace and mercy in all of Scripture. Nathan the Prophet confronted David, and he responded:

2 Samuel 12:13a—“I have sinned against the Lord.”

This is how we should respond when we sin. In these few words David provides a number of lessons:

  • Take ownership: “I have…”
  • Call it what it is: “sin.”
  • Acknowledge the sin was “against the Lord”
  • Avoid excuses and blame shifting.

Then Nathan said:

2 Sam 12:13b—“The Lord also has taken away your sin.”

These are some of the most amazing words in the Old Testament. Despite the enormity and wickedness of David’s sin, it was “taken away.” Hebrews 10:4 and 11 both state:

“It is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins.”

Sacrifices couldn’t forgive sins, say nothing of take them away. How could Nathan say this to David? His sins were taken away the same way ours are taken away:

  • When John the Baptist saw Jesus he said, “The Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world” (John 1:29).
  • 1 John 3:5 says “[Jesus] was manifested to take away our sins.”

If any Old Testament sacrifices could take away sins, Jesus’s sacrifice would’ve been unnecessary. David looked forward in faith to Jesus the way we look backward in faith to our Savior.

The New Covenant Foreshadowed in the Old Covenant

The grace and mercy David received provide a beautiful glimpse of the New Covenant under the Old Covenant. What did David do to receive this forgiveness? Psalm 51:16-17 records:

For You do not desire sacrifice, or else I would give it;
You do not delight in burnt offering.
The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit,
A broken and a contrite heart—
These, O God, You will not despise.

David didn’t offer any sacrifices. He had a spiritual insight that was tremendous. He knew parts of the New Testament before they were written, and he knew no Old Testament sacrifices could make up for his sins.

But he did know there was a “sacrifice” he could “give”; he knew there was an “offering” God “desired”: “a broken spirit, a broken and a contrite heart.”

David Confess his sin and it “took away” evil sins he committed. This is without personal merit, human effort, or penance. This is New Covenant forgiveness by grace; justification by faith.

Forgiveness that Provided Life Instead of Death

David’s sins demanded death, but he found: life. Nathan also said:

2 Samuel 12:13c—“You shall not die.”

These words mean David was going to die. The Old Covenant (the Law) demanded what it always demands: death. But David was able to find life. He recognized the greatness of what took place, which led him to write Psalm 32. Paul quoted this in Romans 4, showing forgiveness and salvation took place the same way in the Old and New Testaments.

Discussion Questions to Answer in the Comments Section 

  • Do you agree or disagree with the post?
  • How did you previously think people were forgiven and saved in the Old Testament? Do you think that now?
  • What other supporting verses from the Old Testament come to mind? What verses from the New Testament?

Israel’s holiness and the ceremonial commands

Why did Israel have to follow the ceremonial commands in the Law?
Why did Israel have to follow the ceremonial commands in the Law?

One of the more common questions I receive relates to the ceremonial commands in the Mosaic Law. People will ask, “Why did Israel have all those weird rules in the Old Testament?”

The simple answer is so Israel could be a holy people. Now the longer answer…

The Mosaic Law contains 613 commands divided into two categories:

  1. The moral – or “common sense” – commands. You shall not murder, commit adultery, steal, or lie. These commands are based on God’s holy nature. God doesn’t change, so these commands are unchanging as well and carried into the New Testament. They are part of the Law of Christ and are still binding for Christians today.
  2. The ceremonial commands are not obvious or common sense:
    • Killing a perfectly good animal for a sacrifice. All the sacrifices and offerings are ceremonial commands.
    • The feasts and festivals.
    • Abstaining from certain foods, such as pork and rabbit.
    • Farming a certain way.
    • Wearing – or not wearing –clothes a certain way, including not mixing certain fabrics together.

The purpose of the ceremonial commands causes the most confusion. Nobody wonders why God told Israel not to murder, commit adultery, steal, or lie. But people wonder why Israel wasn’t supposed to eat certain foods or combine certain fabrics.

The ceremonial commands deal with holiness, not morality.

Continue reading “Israel’s holiness and the ceremonial commands”

Blessings of the Old Testament

In yesterday’s Easter sermon, Genesis 22:1-4 A Father’s Love, I discussed the primary purpose of the Old Testament: leading us to Christ. Paul said, “The law was our tutor to bring us to Christ” (Gal 3:24). After we’ve come to Christ, the New Testament contains a number of verses discussing the new relationship believers have to the Law. We are “free from the Law” (Rom 7:3), “dead to the Law” (Rom 7:4 & Gal 2:19), “delivered from the Law” (Rom 7:6) and “no longer under the Law” (Gal 3:25 & 5:18). In Romans 10:4 Paul said, “Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes” and in Galatians 3:19 he said the Law was only “until the Seed (Jesus) should come.

The Old Testament primarily accomplishes this two ways. First, there were prophecies of Christ. Second, there are clear pictures and types of Him.

You could read all these verses and wonder what this means for us as believers: “What should we think of the Old Testament? What should be our relationship to it as New Testament believers? Is the Old Testament as beneficial as the New Testament?”

Considering how much I’ve taught from the Old Testament, I’d like to hope it’s obvious to my congregation how much I love it, value it, and recognize its equality with the New Testament. The fact is, Scripture nowhere presents any books or verses – say nothing about Testaments – as being superior to another. The blessings God’s Word afford are afforded from anywhere in Scripture. Every verse accomplishes the following blessings…

  • Equips: All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work (2 Tim 3:16, 17).
  • Cleanses: Christ…cleanses [the church] with the washing of water by the word, that He might present her to Himself a glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that she should be holy and without blemish. (Eph 5:26, 27).
  • Convicts: For the Word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the division of soul and spirit, and of joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart (Heb 4:12).
  • Sanctifies: Sanctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth (John 17:17).
  • Imparts faith: Faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God (Rom 10:17).

One of the other blessings of the Old Testament is it provides examples for us to learn from:

  • Romans 15:4—For whatever things were written before [referring to the Old Testament] were written for our learning, that we through the patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope.
  • 1 Corinthians 10:11—Now all these things happened to them as examples, and they were written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the ages have come.

The Old Testament provides a backdrop for New Testament instruction. Certain accounts and individuals in the Old Testament help us make practical application of New Testament commands. Sometimes the individuals will serve as positive examples through their obedience, while other times they will serve as negative examples through their disobedience.

Jesus’ Miracles Prefigured in the Old Testament

marriage-gods-way-author-scott-lapierre-jesus-miraclesThe Old Testament is about Jesus. There were prophecies He would fulfill, as well as pictures and types of Him: the manna, the rock in the wilderness, the bronze serpent, etc. The three miracle workers in the Old Testament (Moses, Elijah and Elisha) even performed miracles that prefigured some of the miracles Jesus would perform…miracles He’d often perform in a greater way.

Here are a few examples:

  • Moses unleashed ten judgments on one nation (Exodus 7-12), but Jesus will unleash twenty-one judgments on the whole earth (attributed to Him in Rev 6:16 with the words “wrath of the Lamb”).
  • Elijah was taken up to heaven in a whirlwind (2 Kings 2:11), but Jesus ascended to heaven on His own (Acts 1:9).
  • Elisha fed one hundred men with twenty loaves (2 Kings 4:42-44), but Jesus fed 5,000 and 4,000 men with five and seven loaves (Matthew 14:13-21, 15:32-39).
  • Elisha cleansed one man of leprosy (2 Kings 5:1-14), but Jesus cleansed ten men (Luke 17:11-19).
  • Elisha knew what Gehazi had done (2 Kings 5:26), but Jesus knows what all men have done (John 2:24).
  • Elisha’s death gave one man temporary life (2 Kings 13:21), but Jesus’ death gives many eternal life (John 3:16).

There’s another example in yesterday’s sermon: when the Man of God heals King Jeroboam’s withered hand, it prefigures Jesus healing the man with the withered hand. Compare these verses:

  • 1 Kings 13:4 His hand, which he stretched out toward him, withered. 6 So the man of God entreated the Lord, and the king’s hand was restored to him, and became as before.
  • Luke 6:10 [Jesus] said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” And he did so, and his hand was restored as whole as the other.

As you read through the Old Testament, for your enjoyment and for your benefit, look for the tremendous prophecies, pictures and types of your Savior! In Hebrews 10:7 Jesus said, “Behold, I have come – in the volume of the book it is written of Me.”

The true and better Sabbath rest found in Jesus

The true and better Sabbath rest found in Jesus
Are you exhausted striving to be accepted by God in your own effort?

“How is Jesus our Sabbath?” I’ve received this question a number of times. Now I can point people to this post!

The Old Testament is about Jesus. He’s revealed through prophecies and types:

  • The sacrifices looked forward to Jesus as the true and better sacrifice (1 John 2:2).
  • The priesthood looked forward to Jesus as the true and better High Priest (Heb 4:14).
  • The judges looked forward to Jesus as the true and better Judge (John 5:22).
  • The prophets looked forward to Jesus as the true and better Prophet (Deut 18:15-19).
  • The kings looked forward to Jesus as the true and better King of Kings (Rev 19:16).

And the Sabbath looked forward to the true and better rest found in Jesus!

Jesus provides a Sabbath rest that’s as continual as God’s rest after the sixth day of creation.

Hebrews 4:9 There remains therefore a Sabbath rest for the people of God. 10 For he who has entered His rest has himself also ceased from his works as God did from His.

The Greek word for “Sabbath rest” is sabbatismos, and this is the only place it occurs in Scripture. The definition is, “the blessed rest from toils and troubles looked for in the age to come by the true worshippers of God and true Christians.”

Genesis 2:2 On the seventh day God ended His work and rested.

God didn’t rest for one day only to begin working again on the eighth day. He began a rest that continued indefinitely. Hebrews 4:9 and 10 look back to God’s rest to make the point that this is the same rest that’s available to believers. Hence the words, “a Sabbath rest for the people of God…ceased from his works as God did from His.” 

Believers can rest from their labors as much as God was able to rest from His. This is a rest that goes on as indefinitely as God’s rest went on indefinitely. This rest found in Christ is much better than the one day of rest found in the Old Testament.

Jesus provides a Sabbath rest from working for salvation.

People labored under the Law to be accepted by God. They constantly disobeyed His commands, so He graciously provided sacrifices that restored fellowship with Him. But these sacrifices couldn’t take away sins. Hebrews 10:4 and 11 both state, “It is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins.”

Animal sacrifices atoned for, or covered sins, but that’s a far cry from having sins removed. Jesus was sacrificed because He was able to do what Old Testament sacrifices could not do:

  • When John the Baptist saw Jesus, in John 1:29 he said, “Behold! The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!”
  • 1 John 3:5 [Jesus] was manifested to take away our sins.

Until Jesus, people struggled under the Law. Just as they continued working after a one-day rest, so too did their sacrifices continue. Contrast these verses:

  • Hebrews 10:1 The law can never, by the same sacrifices repeated endlessly year after year, make perfect those who draw near to worship.
  • “[Jesus] offered one sacrifice for sins forever, then sat down at the right of God” (Heb 10:12).

Jesus did the work for us, then He rested. Now He offers this rest to us:

Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light” (Matt 11:28-30).

God wants us to enter this rest for ourselves. That’s why Hebrews 4:9 says, There remains therefore a Sabbath rest for the people of God.”

How do you enter this Sabbath rest?

Hebrews 4:3 We who have believed do enter that rest.

If you believe the Gospel you’ve entered God’s rest. You’ve ceased working for salvation and trusted Christ’s work for you. The Sabbath found in Jesus is bigger than resting one day per week: it’s realizing salvation is by grace through faith and trusting in that everyday. Are you still working for salvation or are you resting in Christ?

Do you have any questions about the Sabbath or the rest you have in Christ? What does it mean to you to rest in Christ? Share your thoughts or questions below!

Barry Branaman: a great friend and mentor

Barry Branaman
Barry with his wonderful wife Kathy on the day of his graduation from seminary in 2009.

When people discuss their blessings, they’ll usually mention spouses, children, friends, health, finances, etc. If you asked me to discuss my blessings I hope I would mention the godly men God has put in my life. One of the most important is Barry Branaman.

He was a mutual friend of Elwyn and me when I taught in Marysville, CA. I met Barry through his two daughters who attended a young adults’ Bible study I started attending. He became my mentor soon after I became a Christian. The first Bible study I ever led took place in his living room under his supervision. He rarely said anything, but it was a constant source of encouragement and comfort to have him present. I knew he could answer any questions that I couldn’t.

Barry taught me to make time for people.

I spent many hours in Barry’s living room talking to him about the Bible. People have told me that I ask a lot of questions, and I would agree; however, Barry was the person God put in my life at that time to answer all the questions I had as a new Christian…and there were a lot. If I had to single out the one person who helped me understand the Old Testament it was Barry.

Barry taught me about stewardship.

I told a story in a sermon about Barry helping me see our possessions as a stewardship. When I thanked Barry for letting us use their home for our bible study, his simple response was, “That’s what it’s for.” With Barry everything he had was for serving God’s Kingdom. When Katie and I visited California in December 2012, we stayed with Barry and his wife Kathy. From the moment Barry and I saw each other I felt like no time had passed. He was as gracious answering my questions then, as he had been eight years earlier.

When I moved to Lemoore, CA in 2004 I remember standing in Barry’s kitchen telling him goodbye and that I really loved him. In return he gave me A Harmony of the Gospels, which I just took off the bookshelf behind my desk to read the note he wrote inside:

“To Scott,

May the Good News ever grace your heart and lips, thoughts and life. may the love of God always surround you and keep you in all ways. May your service in Christ be ever for His glory. May the Holy Spirit be your continued guide and Comforter, “empowerer” and keep.

Your brother forever,

Barry”

Barry still speaks.

On Thursday I received the news that Barry Branaman passed away at the age of 59. Last week’s sermon was about finishing strong, and Barry is an example of a man who did that wonderfully. I’m very thankful God blessed me with such a great friend, mentor, and brother in Christ. I’m much better for having known Barry, and by “better” I mean I have a deeper love for God and His Word because of him.

Hebrews 11:4 says, “Abel still speaks even though he is dead” and that could be said of Barry. I learned so much from him that when I’m teaching the Bible, often I’m passing along what he taught me.

If you knew Barry Branaman and would like to share a memory about him, I’m sure it would be a blessing to anyone who reads this post.