A Father’s Love – Part I – Genesis 22.1-4

 

The title of this morning’s sermon is, “A Father’s Love.”

I decided to teach on Gen 22 for Resurrection Sunday, and you’re not going to believe it, but I couldn’t get it into one sermon.

· Last year I preached on Isa 53 and it took me 3 sermons.

· The year before that I preached on Daniel’s Seventy Weeks and it took me 5 sermons.

So if I can finish Gen 22 next week, I’ll be improving each year going from 5 to 3 to 2.

When I talked to Katie about it, she gave me two encouragements:

  1. First, we have the Easter Program next Sunday night, so it’s sort of like we’re keeping the sermon focused on Easter for the program.

  2. Second, Katie said – and I quote –

    “It’s like we’re a really spiritual church b/c we celebrate Christ’s resurrection over a few Sundays. Why should we celebrate it one Sunday when we can
    celebrate it for two? Or three…or five.”

We’re going to begin w/ our first lesson…

LESSON 1: (PART I) THE OLD TESTAMENT IS ABOUT JESUS

Please listen to these verses discussing the Old Testament being about Jesus:

  • Luke 24:27 Beginning at Moses and all the Prophets
    (which is a way to refer to the OT), [Jesus] expounded to them in all the Scriptures THE THINGS CONCERNING HIMSELF.
  • Luke 24:44

    [Jesus] said, “All things must be fulfilled which were written in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms CONCERNING
    ME.”

· When Philip recognized Jesus was the Messiah, he wanted Nathaniel to meet Him:

John 1:45 Philip found Nathanael and said, “We have found Him OF WHOM MOSES IN THE LAW, AND ALSO THE PROPHETS, WROTE—Jesus of Nazareth, the son of
Joseph.”

Philip understood the OT was about Jesus.

  • In John 5:39 & 46 Jesus said,

    “You search the Scriptures, for in them you think you have eternal life; and THESE ARE THEY WHICH TESTIFY OF ME…If you believed Moses, you would
    believe Me; for HE WROTE ABOUT ME.”
  • In Heb 10:7 Jesus said, “Behold, I have come – in the volume of the book IT IS WRITTEN OF ME.”

So the OT is about Jesus and there are primarily two ways this takes place…

First, the OT contains tremendous prophecies about Christ.

Second, the OT contains dramatic types – or shadows – of Christ…

  • Heb 10:1 The Law
    (referring to the OT) was only A SHADOW of the good things to come not the realities themselves; the realities are
    found in Christ.
  • Col 2:16-17 A festival or a new moon or Sabbaths…are A SHADOW of things to come, but the substance is of Christ.
    A shadow is a perfect way to describe the types of Christ in the OT:

o First, shadows give you an outline or idea of what something looks like w/o completely revealing the object…like Christ wasn’t completely revealed in the
OT.

o Second, when you see a shadow, you know there must be something casting the shadow…and that’s Christ.

o Finally, you never look at a shadow and think it’s the real thing: you don’t see the shadow of a tree or car and think it’s a tree or car. Shadows have
no real substance or material themselves; they’re not the reality.

§ In the language of Heb 10:1 the reality is found in Christ.

§ In the language of Col 2:17 the substance is found in Christ.

Many of the types and shadows of Christ in the OT are identified for us in the NT. For example:

  • Jesus compared Himself with the Bronze Serpent: John 3:14 As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up,

· Jesus compared Himself w/ the manna: John 6:32-33 Jesus said, “Moses did not give you the bread from heaven, My Father gives you the true bread from heaven (referring to
Himself). For the bread of God is He who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.”

  • Rom 5
    says Adam was a type of Christ.
  • 1 Cor 5:7
    says Jesus was the true and greater Passover Lamb.
  • In 1 Cor 10:4 Paul says the rock in the wilderness that provided Israel with water WAS Christ.

· Circumcision was only a picture of putting off flesh that has its true and greater fulfillment in Christ who helps us put off our sinful flesh: Col 2:11 In [Christ] you were circumcised without hands by putting off…the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ.

  • Heb 3 and 4
    says the Sabbath is only a picture of the true and greater rest found in Christ.

· When the veil in the temple was torn, it revealed the access we have to God. The veil itself was a picture of Christ’s body, which when “torn” on the
cross gave us access to God: Heb 10:20 [We have] a new and living way [to God] which [Jesus] consecrated for us, through the veil, [WHICH] IS, HIS FLESH.

So we have all these types and shadows, which begs the question: what’s their purpose? Their purpose was to point us to Christ…

Matt 11:13 All the prophets and the law
(referring to the OT) prophesied until John [the Baptist].

It says until John b/c Christ was veiled in the OT through the types and shadows, but when John came on the scene as Jesus’ forerunner,
Jesus was no longer veiled. John could point Him out: John 1:29 and 1:36 [John] said, “Behold! The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!

When it says all the prophets and the law prophesied until John it’s as though the OT served as a treasure map to lead us to Christ, who
is the treasure. And this brings us to Lesson 1, Part II…

LESSON 1: (PART I) THE OLD TESTAMENT IS ABOUT JESUS (PART II) SERVING AS A TREASURE MAP TO LEAD US TO HIM.

Think of Gal 3:24 [which says] the law was our tutor to bring us to Christ. When people come to Christ the Old Testament has served its
primary purpose in being a tutor – or map – that leads us to Christ. I say “primary purpose” b/c that’s not the only purpose of the OT – you can
read about some of the other blessings of the OT in the bulletin letter – but if you had to choose the most important purpose of the OT, it would be
directing people to Christ.

Because here’s the thing, and I can’t say this strongly enough:

  • If you learned everything the OT could teach…
  • If you could recount every story…
  • If you memorized countless verses…

But…

· You didn’t use the OT as a treasure map to find Christ…

· If you failed to allow the OT to be your tutor to bring you to Christ…

Then you’ve made the same mistake the religious leaders made in Jesus’ day: you search the Scriptures, for in them you think you have eternal life, but you miss that they testify of Christ…and in missing that you
fail to obtain eternal life.

There’s a small, but wonderful story that occurs in John 12:20-21. It says there were certain Greeks…who came to worship…[and] they [said] to Philip, “Sir, we wish to see Jesus.” This should be our hearts! We
should want to see Jesus! And this is my desire for all of us this morning as we look at Abraham and Isaac, b/c as far as types and shadows go, this is one
of the greatest in the entire Old Testament.

Now first, I want to ask you to imagine something…

Imagine you prepare a large feast for some friends. You invite them over, but for some reason they decide to sit on the floor and eat the scraps that fall
from the table instead of eating the food you prepared for them.

The reason I want you to picture this is if you read Gen 22 and you don’t see Christ in it:

· You’re like the person sitting under the table eating the scraps that fall, missing the wonderful feast you could be enjoying.

· You’re looking at the shadow of a tree and you’re saying, “Hey, look at that tree!”

  • If you only see Abraham and Isaac:

o In the language of Heb 10:1 you’re missing the reality, which is Christ.

o In the language of Col 2:17 you’re missing the substance that is found in Christ.

So let me be very clear…

This chapter is NOT primarily about Abraham and Isaac. Yes, they’re discussed, but they serve only as the type or shadow. We want to see the true and
greater Father and Son in the story, and that’s God the Father and His Son Jesus Christ.

If you write in your Bible – and I’m going to invite you to do that a number of times this morning – at the top of Gen 22 you can write, “This is about God the Father and God the Son.”

This chapter beautifully pictures the two things we celebrate every Good Friday and Resurrection Sunday:

  • God’s willingness to sacrifice His Son…
  • Jesus’ willingness to be sacrificed.

Now let’s look at the verses…

1

Now it came to pass after these things that God tested Abraham, and said to him, “Abraham!”

And he said, “Here I am.”

 

While my primary purpose is to make sure we see Jesus in this chapter, my secondary purpose is to learn from – and be encouraged by – Abraham and Isaac’s
tremendous examples. And we begin to do that by looking at Abraham’s response to God: he says, “Here I am.” These words mean more than, “I am here”, they mean, “I am ready.”

  • I am ready to serve.
  • I am ready to do what You want Lord!

Other great men said these exact same words:

  • Jacob in Gen 46:2.
  • Moses in Exo 3:4.
  • Samuel in 1 Sam 3:4.
  • Isaiah in Isa 6:8.

And in each instance, what God wanted was only revealed AFTER the individual expressed his readiness to serve.

A small application for us is, Abraham’s response captures the hearts we should have toward God. Hearts that say, Here I am. I am ready. I am willing.”


Now before we go any further, I want you to know the typology between Isaac and Jesus strongly begins in verse 2. When we read that verse, I want to
encourage you ahead of time to strive to see how the language used between Abraham and Isaac is the language used in the New Testament between God the
Father and God the Son. The collective force of all the parallels we’re about to read in verse 2 establishes the typology between Isaac and Jesus…

2a
Then He said, “Take now your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love,

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART I) NAMED BY GOD.

The mention of Isaac’s name draws a connection to Jesus, b/c Isaac had the rare distinction – like Jesus did – of having a name chosen by God as opposed to
being chosen by earthly parents. Listen to the parallelism between these two verses connecting Isaac and Jesus:

  • Gen 17:19 Sarah…shall bear you a son, and you shall call his name Isaac.
  • Matt 1:21 [Mary] shall bring forth a Son, and you shall call His name Jesus.

Now, before we discuss the next connection between Isaac and Jesus, I want to remind you of something I’ve discussed before called The Principle of First
Mention. This is where scholars look at the first time words are used in the Bible, or used in the Old or New Testament, or sometimes even the first time a
word is used in a book. The idea is when a word is used for the first time God is indicating the truest meaning or sense of the word. Since words are used
multiple times throughout Scripture, the first use can be consulted for later comparisons.

In verse 2, this is the first time the word love is used in Scripture. Consider the number of different relationships that involve love.
There’s…

· The love a child might feel toward a parent…

· The love a sibling might feel toward another sibling…

  • The love a husband might feel toward his wife…

And up to this point we have seen all these relationships in Scripture. So it’s interesting the first time the word love is used it describes the love a
father – Abraham – feels toward a son: Isaac. And this brings us to the next part of Lesson 2…

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART II) LOVED BY THEIR FATHER.

If you write in your Bible, circle the words whom you love and write Matt 3:17. Speaking of The Principle of First
Mention, Matt 3:17 is the first time the word love is used in the New Testament. And it’s also describing a Father’s love
for His Son: it’s when God’s voice rang out at Jesus’ baptism saying something similar to verse 2: This is My Son, WHOM I LOVE.”

Just like Isaac was the object of his father’s love toward the beginning of the Old Testament, so too was Jesus the object of His Father’s love toward the
beginning of the New Testament.


Next, look at the word only. Let me first tell you what the word only doesn’t mean: it doesn’t mean single; it doesn’t mean only the way we normally think of the word only. I know that sounds odd, but one way we
know this is true is Isaac isn’t Abraham’s only son. He had another son named Ishmael.

So why did God call Isaac Abraham’s only son?

The Old Testament has three Hebrew words for only:

  • One word is raq (pr: rack). Here’s one place
    it’s used: before the Flood

    Gen 6:5 [says God] saw the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and every intent of the thoughts of his heart was ONLY evil
    continually.
  • Another Hebrew word for only ‘ak
    (pr: ack). Here’s one place it’s used: after The Flood

    Gen 7:23 [says God] destroyed all living things which were on the face of the ground….ONLY Noah and those who were with him in the ark
    remained alive.

 

But these aren’t the words used for only in Gen 22:2. Instead, it’s the word yachiyd (pr: yah-heed) and it means unique.
It’s referring to Isaac being Abraham’s unique, special, one-of-a-kind Son.

· One commentary I read said yachiyd (pr: yah-heed) “should be translated as unique.”

  • The ISV translates Gen 22:2 as “Take your son, your UNIQUE son whom you love.”

The same word is translated as precious other places in Scripture:

  • Psa 22:20 Deliver Me from the sword,
    My PRECIOUS life from the power of the dog.
  • Psa 35:17 Rescue me from their destructions,
    My PRECIOUS life from the lions.

Now please look back at Gen 22:2 where it says your only son Isaac

The Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament, which deals with words that have theological significance, says the word for onlyyachiyd (pr: yah-heed) – means, “only begotten son.

And this brings us to the next part of Lesson 2…

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART III) ONLY BEGOTTEN SONS.

When we talk about Jesus being God’s only begotten Son let first tell you what that doesn’t mean, and then I’ll tell you what it does
mean…

We don’t mean Jesus was created. The Nicene Creed, wanting to make sure nobody misunderstood begotten as created says:

“I believe…in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father before all worlds; God of God, Light of Light, very God of
very God; begotten, NOT MADE, being of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were made.”

These words are meant to reveal that Jesus is eternal and not created, and as the Son of God is equal w/ God.

So if begotten doesn’t mean created, what does it mean? The Greek word for only begotten is monogenes (pr:
muh-nog-uh-nace). It means, “single of its kind, only; used of Christ, denotes the only begotten Son of God.” Basically, it means unique, nobody
or nothing else like it. It means Jesus, as God’s Son is…

· Unique from believers who are also called sons and daughters of God by adoption.

· And unique from angels who are called “sons of God” elsewhere in Scripture.

The Greek word for only begotten monogenes (pr: muh-nog-uh-nace) – only occurs 9 times in the entire NT; that’s not a lot of
times! Here are some of the verses where it’s used:

  • John 1:18 No one has seen God at any time. The ONLY BEGOTTEN SON, who is in the bosom of the Father, He has declared Him.

  • John 3:16 For God so loved the world that He gave HIS ONLY BEGOTTEN SON, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.

  • 1 John 4:9 In this the love of God was manifested toward us, that God has sent HIS ONLY BEGOTTEN SON into the world, that we might live through
    Him.

Now interestingly, there’s one other son in the NT who is identified as an only begotten son. Any guesses? Heb 11:17 By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac…HIS ONLY BEGOTTEN SON. So in Gen 22:2 you can circle the
word only and write Heb 11:17.

The point is this…

When God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac, He was asking him to sacrifice his only begotten son – his special, unique, precious son.
That’s why God asked him to sacrifice Isaac instead of Ishmael. But the true and greater fulfillment is God sacrificing His only begotten Son – His special, unique, precious Son.


Now look at the rest of verse 2…

 

2b
and go to the land of Moriah, and offer him there as a burnt offering…

Notice Abraham is told specifically where to sacrifice Isaac: at Moriah. And here’s what’s interesting about Abraham being given a
location…

Verse 1
says God tested Abraham, and what was the test? The test was to see whether he would or would not sacrifice his son. That’s a test Abraham
could’ve passed or failed anywhere: there was no tabernacle or temple yet where sacrifices were supposed to take place. So Abraham really could’ve
sacrificed Isaac in Beersheba where he lived, instead of having to go all the way to Moriah. And Moriah was a 50-mile, 3-day trip from
Beersheba!

So the question is, why would God send Abraham all the way to Moriah except there be something special about that location…and there is…

Moriah
means, “chosen by Jehovah” and it’s only mentioned two times in Scripture:

  • It’s mentioned here in Gen 22:2.
  • And the only other place it’s mentioned is 2 Chr 3:1 where it says Moriah is Jerusalem. You can circle the word Moriah and write, “2 Chr 3:1 Jerusalem.”

So God told Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac in Jerusalem, and this brings us to the next part of Lesson 2…

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART IV) OFFERED UP IN JERUSALEM.

And here’s where it gets more interesting…

It wasn’t even enough just for Abraham to take Isaac to Jerusalem. The rest of verse 2 says…

2c and offer him there
(at Moriah) as a burnt offering ON ONE OF THE MOUNTAINS OF WHICH I SHALL TELL YOU.”

God wanted Abraham to sacrifice Isaac on a specific mountain that God would reveal to him. The Hebrew word for mountain means, “hill, mountain, hill country, mount.” 59 times in the OT this word is translated as hill.

So consider this…

· Since God had Abraham go all the way to what would later be Jerusalem…

· And since God would show Abraham the specific mountain – or hill – in Jerusalem where he’s to sacrifice his son…

· And since this whole situation is supposed to be a picture of what God would do w/ His Son Jesus Christ…

I tend to think the mountain – or hill – that God revealed to Abraham could very well have been Calvary or Golgotha, the same place where
God would sacrifice His Son 2,000 years later.


3 So Abraham rose early in the morning and saddled his donkey, and took two of his young men with him, and Isaac his son; and he split the wood for the
burnt offering, and arose and went to the place of which God had told him.

Now once again, I want to draw your attention to Abraham and his example for us…

Can you imagine what this trip would’ve been like for him? He gets the command and then he has to spend three days walking with the son he knows he’s going
to sacrifice. I’m guessing these must have been the most painful and difficult days of Abraham’s entire life.

But look at verse 3

  • It says Abraham rose early in the morning. He didn’t delay whatsoever in doing what God wanted even though just the thought of it must
    have been excruciating.
  • It says Abraham saddled his [own] donkey and split the wood for the burnt offering. Even though Abraham had a large
    number of servants he did all the work himself. These would be the tasks servants would normally perform, but I suspect Abraham saw this as a task that
    was given to him alone.

Now before we go any further in this story, I want to read two verses and then ask a question…

Luke 24:46
and 1 Cor 15:4 are two significant verses b/c they both state that it was prophesied in the OT the Messiah would be raised from the dead
on the third day. Please listen…

  • Luke 24:46 [Jesus] said to them, “THUS IT IS WRITTEN
    (which means it was prophesied in the OT)…for the Christ to suffer and to RISE FROM THE DEAD THE THIRD DAY.
  • 1 Cor 15:4 [Jesus] was buried, and He rose again THE THIRD DAY ACCORDING TO THE SCRIPTURES.

There were a number of clear prophecies in the OT about the Messiah being resurrected, but in these verses you have Jesus and Paul both saying the OT also
prophesied the Messiah would be raised from the dead on the third day. And this brings us to the next part of Lesson 2…

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART V) RAISED ON THE THIRD DAY

Here’s the question…

Where in the OT did it prophesy the Messiah would be raised from the dead on the third day?

· Everyone knows Jesus was raised from the dead on the third day…

· Jesus and Paul both said it was prophesied in the Old Testament the Messiah would be raised from the dead on the third day?

· Today we’re celebrating Christ being raised from the dead on the third day?

But does anyone actually know where that prophecy is recorded?

There are two reasons you might not know:

  1. First, it’s not as clear as other prophecies.
  2. Second, many of the prophecies in the OT have a verse in the NT quoting them, identifying them as an OT prophecy. For example:

a. Matt 1:23 quotes Isa 7:14 that the Messiah would be born of a virgin.

b. Matt 2:6 quotes Micah 5:2 that the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem.

c. John 13:18 quotes Psa 41:9 that the Messiah would be betrayed by a close friend.

  1. But when Jesus is raised from the dead on the third day, there’s no verse in the OT quoted so we can say, “Okay, this verse prophesied of that happening.”

But Jesus and Paul both said it was prophesied in the OT, so again, the question is, “Where???”

There are three possibilities…

First, there’s Jonah…

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART V) RAISED ON THE THIRD DAY AND THIS WAS PROPHESIED OF (PART VI) THROUGH JONAH.

Jesus said Jonah was supposed to serve as a picture or type of His death, burial and resurrection. If you’re familiar with Jonah’s book you can see how
that happens:

  • Jonah “dies” in chapter 1 when he’s swallowed by the fish: Jonah 1:17 The Lord prepared a great fish to swallow Jonah. And Jonah was in the belly of the fish THREE DAYS AND THREE NIGHTS.
  • He’s “buried” in chapter 2 while he’s in the fish. That’s why you see all the verses discussing death and burial. You read the second chapter
    of Jonah and think, “Is he dead or alive?” Listen to some of the verses:

o Jonah 2:1 “Out of the belly of Sheol I cried. He says he’s in Sheol, which is the abode of the dead.

o Jonah 2:6 I went down to the [roots] of the mountains; The earth with its bars closed behind me forever; (it’s like he’s buried
deep in the earth) Yet You have brought up my life from the pit. He’s looking forward to being resurrected, and the chapter concludes w/ a
picture of that…

o Jonah 2:10 So the Lord spoke to the fish, and it vomited Jonah onto dry land. And I bet he felt like he was
resurrected!

Jesus completes the typology for us, making it clear Jonah pictures His death, burial and resurrection: the religious leaders wanted a sign and Jesus
rebuked them saying Mat 12:39 “An evil and adulterous generation seeks after a sign, and no sign will be given except the sign of the prophet Jonah.

40 For AS JONAH WAS THREE DAYS AND THREE NIGHTS IN THE BELLY OF THE GREAT FISH, SO WILL THE SON OF MAN BE THREE DAYS AND THREE NIGHTS IN THE HEART OF
THE EARTH.

So Jesus said Jonah served as a sign of His death, burial and resurrection.


Second, there’s an interesting verse in Hosea, and this brings us to the next part of Lesson 2…

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART V) RAISED ON THE THIRD DAY AND THIS WAS PROPHESIED OF (PART VII) BY HOSEA.

The end of Hosea 5 describes God “executing” Israel: Hos 5:14 [God says] I will be like a lion to [Israel]…I, even I, will tear them and go away;

I will take them away, and no one shall rescue.

 

Then Hosea 6 describes God raising Israel from the dead on the third day: Hosea 6:2 After two days He will revive us; ON THE THIRD DAY HE WILL RAISE US UP, That we may live in His sight. This could be a reference
to Christ’s resurrection on the third day.


Now for the third and final place – and I would say the most convincing place – prophesying of Christ’s resurrection on the third day…any guesses?

Please look at Gen 22:4

4
Then ON THE THIRD DAY Abraham lifted his eyes and saw the place afar off.

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH (PART V) RAISED ON THE THIRD DAY AND THIS WAS PROPHESIED OF (PART VIII) THROUGH ISAAC.

Look at the words on the third day. Please don’t miss the beauty of this…

Today we’re celebrating what Christ did 2,000 years ago, BUT 2,000 years before that these words were written prefiguring what Jesus would do 2,000 years
later.

I don’t know what’s going on in your life, but if you’re at all worried about tomorrow, I hope you can be encouraged by the reality that:

· God not only knows what’s going to happen tomorrow…

· He knows what’s going to happen 2,000 years from now…

· He knows what’s going to happen 4,000 years from now…

And there’s no thwarting His plans!

These words – on the third day – are the words we’re celebrating today: Resurrection Sunday. The words aren’t just referring to the day
Abraham arrived at Moriah, they’re referring to the day Abraham received Isaac back from the dead. These words are the clearest prophecy in the OT of Jesus
being raised from the dead ON THE THIRD DAY.

That might sound hard to believe, but this is not my opinion. Please circle the words on the third day and write, “ Heb 11:19.” Then turn to Heb 11. We won’t come back to Genesis.

 

Let’s start at verse 17…

17
By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises offered up his only begotten

son,

Earlier I told you Isaac was called Abraham’s only begotten son, and there it is in most translations.

Please notice twice it says [Abraham] offered up Isaac:

  1. First, “By faith Abraham, when he was tested, OFFERED UP ISAAC.”
  2. Second, “he who had received the promises OFFERED UP HIS ONLY BEGOTTEN SON.”

Once again you’ve got the language of God the Father and God the Son being used w/ Abraham and Isaac: like Abraham was willing to offer up Isaac, his only
begotten son, so too was God the Father willing to offer up Jesus, His only begotten Son.

 

You can circle the words offered up Isaac and write, “Christ’s sacrifice” b/c that’s what’s being pictured.

Now look at verse 18…

18
of whom it was said,

“In Isaac your seed shall be called,”

This is a quote of Gen 21:12 identifying Isaac as the promised son Abraham’s descendants would come from. God had to make this clear that
Abraham’s descendants wouldn’t be coming from his other son, Ishmael.

19
concluding that God

was

able to raise

him

up, even from the dead, from which he also received him in a figurative sense.

The verse says [Abraham] received [Isaac back] in a figurative sense [from the dead].

The word for figurative is parabolē. It occurs 50 times in
the NT, where 46 times it’s translated as parable.

Even though Abraham never physically sacrificed Isaac – b/c the Angel stopped him – since he was completely committed to doing so, it was as though he
already sacrificed Isaac when he was given the command on the first day; therefore, when the angel stopped Abraham from sacrificing Isaac, it’s like
Abraham received Isaac back from the dead.

And if you look at verse 19 that’s exactly what it says:

  • God raised [Isaac] up
  • It says for Abraham it was like he received Isaac back even from the dead

This prefigures Jesus being raised from the dead. You can circle the words God was able to raise him up, even from the dead and write “Christ’s resurrection.”

Genesis 22 is one of the most vivid and dramatic types or shadows in the OT, but it’s also one of the most unique and here’s why:

· There are other types and shadows of Christ’s death in the OT…

· And there are other types and shadows of Christ’s resurrection in the OT…

But Abraham and Isaac is the only story that prefigures BOTH Christ’s death and resurrection with a confirmation in the NT.

  • In Heb 11:17 you’ve got Isaac connected to Christ’s sacrifice.
  • In Heb 11:19 you’ve got Isaac connected to Christ’s resurrection.

Now here is the super important question we’ve been building up to all this time:

  • When was Isaac raised up?
  • When did Abraham receive Isaac back even from the dead?

According to Gen 22:4 on the third day:

  • That’s when Abraham reached Moriah…

· That’s when he was going to sacrifice Isaac…

  • That’s when the angel stopped him…

And that’s when he received Isaac back even from the dead.

To make it perfectly clear:

· Abraham got the command to sacrifice his son on the first day. On that day b/c Abraham was committed to obeying God – b/c he was committed to sacrificing
his son – that’s the day Isaac died to him. Isaac died on the first day when the command was given.

· Then Abraham received Isaac back from the dead – he was raised to life again, even if it was only done in a figurative sense – by God on the third day.

So if anyone ever asks you, “Where was it prophesied that Jesus would be raised from the dead on the third day?” I’m really hoping I have a
congregation filled w/ people who can answer that question!

Beautiful, isn’t it? Isn’t God’s Word is amazing!

CONCLUSION

Now I want to talk to you a little bit about the title of this sermon. I titled it, “A Father’s Love” b/c those words apply in a number of ways…

Abraham was a father and we can think of his love for his son Isaac. At the beginning of the sermon I told you the first time the word love is used is in Gen 22 to describe Abraham’s love for Isaac. So that makes “A Father’s Love” a fitting title.

We can think of Abraham as a father and the even greater love he must’ve had for God to be willing to sacrifice the son he loved so much. So that makes “A Father’s Love” a fitting title.

We can think of God the Father and the great love He has for His Son Jesus Christ. I told you the first time the word love is used in the New Testament isMatt 3:17 when God said, “This is My Son, WHOM I LOVE.” And that’s repeated in Mark and Luke: the first time the wordlove is used in those Gospels is also describing God’s love for His Son. So it would also be fitting to title this sermon, “A Father’s Love” describing God’s love for Jesus.

But here’s what’s interesting…

After God’s love for His Son is described at the beginning of Matthew, Mark and Luke, something changes in John’s Gospel. The first time the word love is
used it’s not describing God’s love for Jesus. It’s used to describe God’s love for the world:

John 3:16 For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.

That’s why I really chose this title: I want you to think about “A Father’s Love” – but I want you to think about God the Father’s love for you…and this
brings us to our last lesson…

LESSON 3: ABRAHAM AND ISAAC IS ABOUT GOD THE FATHER’S LOVE FOR YOU.

Let me tie together a number of things we discussed so we can understand God’s love for us…

· Isaac was an amazingly loved and special son to his father. Abraham was willing to give him up – he was willing to sacrifice him – out of his love for
God.

· But the true and greater reality we need to take away from this is Jesus was an amazingly loved and special Son to His Father. God was willing to give
Him up – He was willing to sacrifice Him – out of His love for us.

When God asked Abraham to sacrifice his son – something God never had any intention of Abraham actually doing – it looked forward to what God had every
intention of actually doing w/ His own Son.

Maybe you look at this story and to be honest it seems a little cruel. Perhaps you say,

“Why would God do this? Why would God make Abraham wait 25 years for a son – a special, unique son he loved more than almost anything else in the world
– and then ask him to sacrifice him?”

God did this b/c it was meant to serve as a picture of the special, unique Son that God Himself loved more than anything else, but was willing to sacrifice
out of His love for us.

I’m convinced God wanted us to try to imagine what it was like when He sacrificed His Son. So He gave us this story about Abraham and Isaac and through it
God says, “Imagine how hard it was for Abraham, and you’ll have some small idea how hard it was for Me.”

So let’s do this: let’s consider how hard it really would’ve been…

We read these words on a page, but I really want you to imagine God made this request of you w/ one of your sons…

  • Carl, imagine this was one of your sons…
  • Dave, imagine this was one of your sons…
  • Jim, imagine this was one of your sons…

· Mitch, Steve, Gary, Doug, Brian, Jamison, Tim, John, Landon, Andrew, Robert – and all the other men here – imagine this was one of your sons and you were
asked to do this.

And I want us to think about this, so we can have some idea of the great love God had for us in sacrificing His Son.

· Do we understand God didn’t have to do that?

· Do we understand He did it so He could have a relationship w/ sinful people like us: Rom 5:8 God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

A.W. Pink said,

Christ died not in order to make God love us, but because He [does love us]. Calvary is the supreme demonstration of Divine love. Whenever you are
tempted to doubt the love of God, go back to Calvary.”

Whenever you read the story of Abraham and Isaac, think about what Abraham and Isaac were willing to do, but think even more about what God the Father was
willing to do, and think about why He was willing to do it: because of His great love for us.

The only tragedy of all this is some of you will reject this love:

  • You will choose not to repent.

· You will choose not to surrender your life to the Lord.

· You will choose to keep living for yourself.

· You will choose your sin over turning to Christ.

It says, “God so loved the world” not, “The world so loved God.” In Matt 7:13 Jesus said wide is the gate and broad is the way that leads to destruction, and there are many who go in by it. My hope would be as your pastor that none of you
choose that path.

So as we close…

· If any of you wonder if you’re heading down that wide path that leads to destruction, 2 Cor 6:2 [says] now is the day of salvation. Today can be the day you embrace the Father’s love for you.

· On the other hand, maybe some of you have surrendered your lives to Christ, but you wonder whether the Father really loves you or not…there are some
people who have been Christians for years and it’s a daily struggle truly believing how much God loves them…

If either of these is true of you, Pastor Doug and I will be up front after service, and we would count it a privilege to be able to pray with you.

LET’S REVIEW THESE LESSONS:

LESSON 1: (PART I) THE OLD TESTAMENT IS ABOUT JESUS (PART II) SERVING AS A TREASURE MAP TO LEAD US TO HIM.

LESSON 2: ISAAC AND JESUS WERE BOTH:

· (PART I) NAMED BY GOD.

· (PART II) LOVED BY THEIR FATHER.

· (PART III) ONLY BEGOTTEN SONS.

· (PART IV) OFFERED UP IN JERUSALEM.

· (PART V) RAISED ON THE THIRD DAY, AND THIS WAS PROPHESIED OF:

o (PART VI) THROUGH JONAH.

o (PART VII) BY HOSEA.

o (PART VIII) THROUGH ISAAC.

LESSON 3: ABRAHAM AND ISAAC IS ABOUT GOD THE FATHER’S LOVE FOR YOU.

Author: Scott LaPierre